By Jocelyn Chalmers (University of Kent)

Feminists are frequently stereotyped as both humourless and man-hating. How much truth is there to these characterizations, and can we expose feminists to humour that disparages both men and women to find out?

Humour plays an integral role in our everyday lives. It can be an effective way to establish community: laughing with another person shows acceptance and demonstrates a shared perspective. …


By Ammaarah Nilafdeen (University of Delhi)

Despite the fact that South Asia is perceived as a developing region, it continues to grapple with challenges of its own. The region is no stranger to ethno-religious conflicts, border disputes, poverty, political instability and corruption. The initiatives to obtain an insight into the impact of such challenges from a psychological perspective are usually overlooked or discouraged. Much of the existing research and insight is based on an economic or sociological perspective, and therefore are only marginally useful in the fields of peace or political psychology. A 2006 study conducted with a segment of…


By Rongbo Jin (University of Arizona) and Frank J. Gonzalez (University of Arizona)

In the 1999 hit movie, The Matrix, the character named Morpheus at one point describes the allure of the computer program called “the matrix,” which humans have been loaded into so that they experience a virtual fantasy reality while they are passively exploited by machines for their energy in the real world: “You have to understand that most of these people are not ready to be unplugged. And many of them are so inert, so hopelessly dependent on the system that they will fight to protect it.”


By Vera Maren Straßburger (University of Dundee), Caoimhe Ryan (Glasgow Caledonian University) and Stephen Reicher (University of St Andrews)

Historically, sexual and gender minorities have faced surveillance practices which, it has been argued, were used to oppress the group in hetero- and cis-normative societies (Conrad, 2009). For instance, individuals with HIV and AIDS were observed and same-sex sexual behaviours were regulated through policing, justifying such practices under the guise of public health and morality of society. Today, the position of sexual and gender minorities within UK society has changed. Their legal recognition has improved. Transgender individuals have now gained the…


By Yann Rees (Bielefeld University & Münster University) and Sebastian Kurtenbach (Münster University)

During the so called ‘summer of migration’ from 2015–2017 Germany made a name for itself as a welcoming nation becoming a home for about 1 Mio refugees from various countries around the world. Crowds applauding arriving refugees at train stations in major German cities made national and international headlines just as much as chancellor Angela Merkel’s famous phrase “Wir schaffen das” (“We can do it”)[1]. …


By Kostas Papaioannou (Aristotle University of Thessaloniki)and Myrto Pantazi (University of Oxford)

In an ever-changing incomprehensible world, the masses had reached the point where they would, at the same time, believe everything and nothing, think that everything was possible and nothing was true

— Hannah Arendt (1951)

On January 6, 2021, a mob of rioters stormed the US Capitol in an attempt to delay the Electoral College vote count, overturn the recent US election results and disrupt the democratic transition of power, giving a strong blow to American democracy. The US Capitol seize was instigated by false claims of stolen…


By Juliana Ledur Stucky (Pontifícia Universidade Católica do Rio Grande do Sul)

The Brazilian military dictatorship (1964–1985) was a period marked for political repression and restrictions of civil rights, built under the flag of national-development. The officers who proceeded with the coup d’ètat justified their actions under the alleged fear of implementation of communism (Scarparo, Torres & Ecker, 2014), in a period of relevant tension during the Cold War. This period was marked by violations of human rights causing many people to flee the country to avoid political persecution. Two years before the implementation of the exception regime, Psychology was…


By Michael de Quadros Duarte (Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul)

Global crises, whether economic, social or caused by natural disasters, have made the migration movement grow globally. Although migration is a right guaranteed in the universal declaration of human rights, the migratory waves of recent decades have caused social and political conflicts in Europe and the Americas. Brazil is no different and although it is a multicultural country (mainly due to its colonial history), there are still historical reports of prejudice against immigrants (1). The 1907 “expulsion law” of São Paulo senator Adolpho Gordo, which allowed that any…


By Camilo Rincón-Unigarro, María del Pilar Morales-Sierra, Sara Rivera-Escobar & Andrea Correa-Chica

On December 10th, 2016, former president of Colombia Juan Manuel Santos pronounced his Nobel Peace Prize lecture in Oslo. The Prize was awarded to Santos two weeks after the signing of the most recent peace accord in Colombia, settling a five-decade armed conflict, with more than 220.000 people killed, and almost 8 million victims of political violence (1). Delegations of the Colombian government and the FARC-EP guerrilla held peace talks since 2012 in Cuba. And after reaching an initial peace agreement in September 2016, its implementation failed: 50.2%…


By Carolina Rocha and Stephen Reicher (University of St Andrews)

What started in late 2019 as a limited protest against rises in Chilean metro fares turned into a societal uprising met by levels of repression unseen since the end of the Pinochet dictatorship back in 1990. As human rights violations dominated these protests, we explored whether people in Chile were being mobilised into helping those at risk by learning that many were being targets of violence.

This story started decades ago. In 1973, a coup d’état finished with Salvador Allende’s government and initiated a 17-year-long dictatorship, headed by Augusto Pinochet…

Political Psychology

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